‘A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World’ by C. A. Fletcher #AboyAndHisDogBook #NetGalley #amreading #bookbloggers #bookreview @orbitbooks #littlebrownbookgroup @CharlieFletch_r

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“My name’s Griz. My childhood wasn’t like yours. I’ve never had friends, and in my whole life I’ve not met enough people to play a game of football.

My parents told me how crowded the world used to be, but we were never lonely on our remote island. We had each other, and our dogs.

Then the thief came.

There may be no law left except what you make of it. But if you steal my dog, you can at least expect me to come after you.

Because if we aren’t loyal to the things we love, what’s the point?”

I have already made my mental list of the friends to whom I will be lending my copy of this book once I’ve bought it. Yes, Marie Kondo, you heard me right. I’ve already read it, AND I will be buying the physical copy. It will bring me joy sitting on my shelf, available for my kids and friends, whilst all the time looking fabulous in its amazing cover and having one of the best titles I will ever own! This may even be one I’d read again, particularly after the twists revealed in the final fifth.

To me, this is a story about the power of stories; the way they can teach us about the world, ideas, history, practicality, and how they are told, by whom, and for what purpose.

It’s also about humans; how they can be duplicitous, exploitative, selfish, cruel, cowardly and vengeful, whilst also having the capacity to be compassionate, thoughtful, fanciful, brave, loyal and ardent. All our grey areas.

Yet we are also, to our downfall, too clever for our own good. A ‘soft apocalypse’ leaves teenager Griz and his family as a few of the only humans left.

A Boy and his Dog at the End of the World follows Griz on a quest to find a stolen dog, through a wasteland of the last mass human activity a century ago, but one which is on its way to being reclaimed by nature (plastics excepted).

I didn’t read it quickly, but that isn’t because it’s not absorbing; it’s so thought provoking that I think I may have spent an inordinate amount of time staring into space, with it on my mind. Some of the story progresses slowly, but it always feels realistic under the circumstances. It is 100% worth sticking with.

It reminded me a little bit, although the story is different, of a book I read at school in English class, pre-GCSE, called ‘Z for Zachariah’. The apocalyptic circumstances were different, but the dangers which humans can pose to each other, when there aren’t too many of them left, made me pluck this one out of my (very distant) memory.

It’s very well written; the sentences have a lovely, rhythmic balance. It’s a stream of thought-diary-style, and the grammar reflects this. The characters are vivid, and the situations feel uncomfortably real and palpably tense. I loved the duality between one boy and his dog, and another, both at the end of the world. There are so many quotable bits of writing; my e-reader is littered with highlighted notes. John Dark and all associated mispronunciations are especially good!

All of the characters (including the dogs) will stay with me for a long while, as will the situation in which they found themselves. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. Thanks very much to Netgalley and Orbit for the ARC in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.

Publication date in the UK is 25th April 2019. Get yourself a copy here: A Boy and his Dog at the End of the World

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