#BlogTour #BookReview of ‘Weave of Love’ by Rachel J. Bonner @racheljbonner1 @rararesources #bookreview #choicesandconsequences #giveaway

Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for Rachel J Bonner’s third instalment in the Choices and Consequences series, ‘Weave of Love’. Many thanks to Rachel’s Random Resources for including me on the tour, and for my copy of the book.

Weave of Love correct front

The Blurb:

What if the choice you have to make has devastating consequences for others?

How can anyone know the right thing to do?

Leonie chose to sacrifice everything to save other people. Now those around her have to face the consequences – and those consequences are not what they expected.

Prospero must deal with his own guilt. He was the one who gave Leonie the tools she needed – her life was in his hands. To make the most of what she did, he will have to face up to all the family issues he has avoided for so long. Whatever he chooses to do, someone he loves will be hurt. For Leonie’s sake, is he now strong enough to make the choice he couldn’t make before?

The crisis predicted by Lord Gabriel has come and gone. But his task isn’t over. Leonie’s very existence may be out in the open but Gabriel discovers that the past is never what it seems – and nor is the present. How can he use what he now knows to bring together those who have been enemies for as long as anyone can remember?

If he fails in this, everything he’s had to do so far will be in vain.

My Review:

I read ‘Weave of Love’ having not read the first two in the series, and from the outset realised that I had arrived in a story wishing I had read the others. There is a brief and very helpful summary of the action so far, and I did try to glean as much as I could from other sources to understand what I had missed. This is such an involved story and I felt that I had arrived at the immediate aftermath of something very significant, without properly understanding what had gone before, and there is no substitute for reading the series in order I think!

Having said this, Weave of Love is an character driven and absorbing read. I think it’s probably the least action packed of a series which so far must have had a great deal happen, but it is intriguing, emotional and tense, just the same. There is a Christian theme, but this by no mean limits the intended audience for this series and could be enjoyed by anyone, regardless of belief system. It’s really well written with convincing dialogue and great character dynamics.

It is post-apocalyptical and complex, with tense situations, yet the love, belonging and selflessness pervades throughout the story and it feels very comforting somehow. I wouldn’t mind spending a while with Perry’s family!

Without knowing more, and I do think I would like to read the previous books, it seems to be a story which concentrates more on relationships between people rather than being fast paced and action driven. This makes this a very individual and personal book, and I suspect, series.

The Gifts and Shields are a really interesting premise and I enjoyed how this in particular, played out between some of the drama between the various important families in House St. Peter.

All in all, I’d highly recommend ‘Weave of Love’ to fans of character driven romance, with the caveat that the series must be read in order! ‘Strand of Faith’ is the first, and ‘Thread of Hope’, the second. I must get on with it myself!! For an exciting bookish giveaway, please read on below.

Purchase Links to buy for £2.99!:

Amazon UK

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Other Retailers

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Author Bio:

Weave of Love Author Photo

Rachel J Bonner is the author of the compelling and enthralling four book Choices and Consequences series. The first book in the series, Strand of Faith, was published in November 2018. Book 2, Thread of Hope, released on 2nd May 2019, followed by Weave of Love on 24th October, and Cloth of Grace at the end of February 2020.

Getting a degree in engineering, followed by a career in accountancy is probably not a conventional path to becoming an author, particularly in fantasy or romance. Rachel says that, although accountancy isn’t anything like as boring as everyone thinks, writing is a lot more fun.

When not writing, she can be found walking in the beautiful countryside near where she lives, which has influenced much of the scenery in her books, or shooting things with her local archery club. Shooting targets only, honest. Nothing to worry about. (Okay, sometimes we shoot Polo mints. Or cabbages. Still nothing to worry about.)

She also enjoys swimming, eating chocolate chip cookies and growing aromatic herbs, especially thyme and rosemary. It’s no coincidence that her heroine likes the same things.

You can find out more about her books and sign up for Rachel’s newsletters at www.racheljbonner.co.uk

To connect with Rachel J Bonner:

Author page

Twitter

Facebook

Goodreads

***GIVEAWAY!!!***

Win signed copies of Strand of Faith, Thread of Hope and Weave of Love, plus a selection of bookmarks, plus three MixPix acrylic photo tiles (Open INT)

Weave of Love Giveaway 1

Enter here!

*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data. I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

Finally, as usual, this is a blog tour, and there are many other reviews, guest posts, extracts and interviews to read, and I would urge you to read them! The other bloggers on the tour are listed on the banner below:

Weave of Love Full Tour Banner

‘A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World’ by C. A. Fletcher #AboyAndHisDogBook #NetGalley #amreading #bookbloggers #bookreview @orbitbooks #littlebrownbookgroup @CharlieFletch_r

“My name’s Griz. My childhood wasn’t like yours. I’ve never had friends, and in my whole life I’ve not met enough people to play a game of football.

My parents told me how crowded the world used to be, but we were never lonely on our remote island. We had each other, and our dogs.

Then the thief came.

There may be no law left except what you make of it. But if you steal my dog, you can at least expect me to come after you.

Because if we aren’t loyal to the things we love, what’s the point?”

I have already made my mental list of the friends to whom I will be lending my copy of this book once I’ve bought it. Yes, Marie Kondo, you heard me right. I’ve already read it, AND I will be buying the physical copy. It will bring me joy sitting on my shelf, available for my kids and friends, whilst all the time looking fabulous in its amazing cover and having one of the best titles I will ever own! This may even be one I’d read again, particularly after the twists revealed in the final fifth.

To me, this is a story about the power of stories; the way they can teach us about the world, ideas, history, practicality, and how they are told, by whom, and for what purpose.

It’s also about humans; how they can be duplicitous, exploitative, selfish, cruel, cowardly and vengeful, whilst also having the capacity to be compassionate, thoughtful, fanciful, brave, loyal and ardent. All our grey areas.

Yet we are also, to our downfall, too clever for our own good. A ‘soft apocalypse’ leaves teenager Griz and his family as a few of the only humans left.

A Boy and his Dog at the End of the World follows Griz on a quest to find a stolen dog, through a wasteland of the last mass human activity a century ago, but one which is on its way to being reclaimed by nature (plastics excepted).

I didn’t read it quickly, but that isn’t because it’s not absorbing; it’s so thought provoking that I think I may have spent an inordinate amount of time staring into space, with it on my mind. Some of the story progresses slowly, but it always feels realistic under the circumstances. It is 100% worth sticking with.

It reminded me a little bit, although the story is different, of a book I read at school in English class, pre-GCSE, called ‘Z for Zachariah’. The apocalyptic circumstances were different, but the dangers which humans can pose to each other, when there aren’t too many of them left, made me pluck this one out of my (very distant) memory.

It’s very well written; the sentences have a lovely, rhythmic balance. It’s a stream of thought-diary-style, and the grammar reflects this. The characters are vivid, and the situations feel uncomfortably real and palpably tense. I loved the duality between one boy and his dog, and another, both at the end of the world. There are so many quotable bits of writing; my e-reader is littered with highlighted notes. John Dark and all associated mispronunciations are especially good!

All of the characters (including the dogs) will stay with me for a long while, as will the situation in which they found themselves. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. Thanks very much to Netgalley and Orbit for the ARC in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.

Publication date in the UK is 25th April 2019. Get yourself a copy here: A Boy and his Dog at the End of the World

‘Bird Box’ by Josh Malerman #bookbloggers #BirdBox #bookreview #amreading

There’s a lot of buzz about this book at the moment. I bought it a while ago, and it had been waiting patiently on my TBR pile. Then the Netflix film hit, and before I had the chance to read it, my husband had put it on TV. Slightly miffed that I hadn’t got to read it first, I gave in, because it just looked so good. I had also listened to the director, Susanne Bier, talking about it on Women’s hour on Radio 4 the previous week, and found what she said about it fascinating.

I loved the film, despite finding it stressful and frightening. Putting all else aside, I decided to read the book next.

The book is different, as you’d expect. Worse things happen. The film is faithful to the story, with obvious artistic license. When I had read it, I realised how well the casting had been done, for a start. Sandra Bullock has got the character of Malorie down to a tee. She is incredible in this role.

The book then, starts in the most recent period of the story, where Malorie is facing the awful decision to leave the house where she and her two very young children have been for over four years. They must do so blindfolded, and we are struck immediately by the bleakness of their situation and the peril in which she has to put them all to try to escape it. They must somehow negotiate a 20-mile trip down the river, relying only on their hearing in order to navigate it. They believe that someone can help them at the end of this journey, if they make it.

We move interchangeably from the time immediately prior to the collapse of society, where Malorie and her sister, Shannon, are living in a flat together, just starting to notice news reports of unexplained mass suicides in areas of Russia and Europe, to the time where Malorie lives with a group of survivors, and then the journey down the river alone with the children.

During the week where Malorie discovers she is pregnant, following a brief fling, the news that the suicides have come to the USA, and the rumour that it is something that people are seeing, creatures maybe, causing it, leads Shannon to put blankets over the windows and start to block out the outside world. There is no going back from this darkness throughout the vast majority of this novel. The sisters live like this for three months, eating everything they have in the house without leaving it, watching the breaking news which becomes increasingly despondent.

People flood to social media over everything now. I don’t think an apocalyptic event would stop that in the first days, but it doesn’t explicitly happen here. The author is a young guy; I don’t think he would ignore this without purpose, so I guess it was a choice to leave it out. It’s actually scarier without, somehow. As though the emerging situation was of such horror and fear, that people just couldn’t bear to talk about it between themselves. Malorie follows blogs, and reads theories online, but there is no mass hysteria in the way that social media would generate.

Then, the worst happens. Malorie finds her sister dead, and it’s horrific. The blanket had fallen a little from an upstairs window. There is no doubt that there is something outside, and that it’s causing rational people to lose their minds. I can honestly say that I don’t think there is a more chilling premise for a story out there. This situation must come close to the absolute worst thing you can think of. Josh Malerman’s mind is a dark and brilliant place.

Malorie has seen an advert for a place she can go, where other survivors are. Somehow, she drives there with her eyes mostly closed, seeing sinister movement in her peripheral vision. She then begins a prolonged and tense cohabitation with strangers who have survived. The owner of the house, who placed the advert is already dead.
If you have ever cohabitated with other adults before, it’s difficult. Personality clashes, falling out, the peacemakers, the confronters, positive outlook people, negative Noras.

The dynamics are altered here because of the situation; everyone has lost every other person close to them, but the undertones of cohabitation begin to come through, as there is no escape from each other. There is incredible pressure on resources. Malorie and Olympia are the two pregnant women in the house, each with their own huge anxieties about what will happen during and after the birth of their children in this terrifying, claustrophobic, blind world. Tom is the housemate (at the risk of going all Big Brother) who Malorie knows she can rely on, but he is the innovator, the solutions guy, who goes outside to try to find things to help them survive. On one journey, he finds some birds, who are put outside in a box as an alert system. The birdbox outside, resembles the birdbox inside, all trapped.

It turns Sylvia Plath’s bell jar of suicidal thoughts on its head; Malerman’s birdbox is the only prevention from it, although both are suffocating and claustrophobic.

I like how the author gets across the division between what are considered ‘old world fears’, like fear of the dark, fear of basements and attics, and the ‘old world’ problems. The new world is ONLY fear, and nothing else, apart from perhaps, the remotest glint of hope. This is not hope of defeating what’s out there. Malorie’s only desire is to get her children somewhere where they won’t starve, they can take off their blindfolds, and to let them have a taste of a childhood.

Disaster strikes the house eventually, and devastatingly, Malorie is left alone. She is resourceful and determined though, a meticulous planner.

One of the central themes of this novel is motherhood, and to what lengths Malorie forces herself for the children to survive. It’s impossible to fathom what it must be like to think or do the things Malorie does. It’s against instinct. The children are completely compliant with her and are unfailingly obedient. They have learned how to hear and identify sequences of up to forty of the minutest individual sounds. They are only called Boy and Girl, a reflection of Malorie’s reluctance to be attached to them, when she has lost everyone else. She has spent four years training them to make this journey.

If you can follow the journey down the river with Malorie and the children without suffering palpitations, I admire you. It’s just the worst thing. The capability and resilience that children can have in desperate situations is captured so poignantly. Josh Malerman’s ability to describe hearing without seeing in the most hostile world imaginable is terrific.

It is just a happy coincidence that they lived so close to the river in the first place! There are some questions, but I’m not sure they really matter. It’s a cracking book. If you’ve enjoyed the film, the book, I’m sure won’t disappoint you, and likewise, the film won’t let fans of the book down.