#Halloween #BookReview of ‘To Snare A Witch: Book One – Bell, Book and Candle’ by Jay Raven – as part of the @rararesources #blogtour @JayRavenAuthor

What better day could there be than today to welcome you to my slot on the blog tour for Jay Raven’s ‘To Snare a Witch: Book One – Bell, Book and Candle?’ Thanks so much to Rachel’s Random Resources for including me and to the author for a e-copy of this delicious gothic novella, in exchange for my thoughts.

To Snare A Witch EBOOK

The Blurb:

No female dares spurn the lecherous advances of Sir Henry Cruttendon, 17th Century England’s most reviled nobleman. To do so risks a retribution that would terrify the Devil himself.

But Elizabeth Fiennes is no ordinary woman, blessed with stunning beauty, intelligence and guile. Coming from an influential family, she believes she is safe.

What she doesn’t understand is that the Earl is determined to satisfy his lust and plans to use the wave of witch trials, fear and superstition sweeping the countryside to force her into his clutches.

And as he springs his malicious trap it triggers a chain of unholy events plunging hunter and prey into a maelstrom of deceit, terror and depravity – leaving them both staring into the face of true evil…

My Review:

This is just the perfect novella for this time of year, short, malevolent, and perfectly formed. It begins with an English witch trial, perpetrated by the fraudulent witchfinders Thomas Gaunt and his assistant Matthew Stiles, who stalk brazenly from village to village, collecting coin in exchange for a theatrical performance of the barbaric spectator sport of identifying women as witches. I admit to having a slightly morbid fascination with this historical period, which is why I jumped at the chance to be on this tour, and I was not disappointed.

This is an incredibly well crafted story, which to say it can be read in under an hour, brings memorable, fully rounded characters and an atmospheric, endearing love story with the grotesque and the evil present in equal measure. It’s glorious, and I can see myself reading this again before the thinning of the veil is complete. I’d take a witch any day, compared with the every day malevolence of some human beings. Twists and turns aplenty, exceptionally good writing – what’s not to enjoy?!

I also spent quite a while on the Internet, researching the nursery rhyme ‘Ride A Cock Horse to Banbury Cross’…

Highly recommended – if clever and unsettling gothic stories are your thing, it’s more than worth your time to spend a dark, stormy autumn evening with ‘To Snare A Witch’. Superb.

To get yourself a copy, follow one of these purchase links:

Amazon UK

Amazon

About the author

To Snare Jay Raven 5

Jay Raven is the author of Gothic chillers and historical horror reminding readers that the past is a dangerous place to venture, full of monsters and murderous men. He blames his fascination with vampires, witches and werewolves on the Hammer Horror films he watched as a teenager, but living in a creepy old house on the edge of a 500-acre wood may have something to do with it.

If you would like to be informed of new releases, enjoy free short stories and access exclusive giveaways and competitions, please subscribe to Jay’s monthly newsletter on his website at www.jayraven.co.uk

Social Media Links

Website

Twitter

Facebook

As always, this is a blog tour, and there are many other unique perspectives on the book. The other bloggers are on the tour banner below, and I would urge you to check them out!

To Snare A Witch Full Tour Banner

 

 

 

‘Tangled Roots’ by Denise D. Young @rararesources @ddyoungbooks #BlogTour #TangledRoots

Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for Denise D Young’s paranormal fantasy ‘Tangled Roots’, the first book in her Tangled Magic series. Many thanks to Rachel’s Random Resources for including me, and to the author for the copy of the book, which I have reviewed as a reader, honestly, individually and impartially.

Tangled4

The Blurb

A beautiful witch lost in time. A brooding farm boy with magic in his blood and a chip on his shoulder. Dark secrets and shadowy magic. Paranormal romance with a time slip awaits in the first book of this new series.

Cassie Gearhart casts a spell in the forest in the summer of 1974. The next thing she knows, she wakes up to find the world irrevocably changed.

It’s 2019, for one thing. For another, all of her coven members have vanished, leaving behind only one man who holds the key to their secrets.

Nick Felson has sworn off magic, until a confused Cassie knocks on his door in the middle of the night, somehow missing forty-five years’ worth of time. But Nick knows falling for the captivating witch means letting magic back into his life—and that’s one line he swore he’d never cross.

Can Cassie unravel the mystery that transported her decades into the future? And can Nick resist the powerful magic and heart-pounding passion that swirl in the air whenever he and Cassie are together?

The Tangled Magic Series is intended for readers 18-plus who enjoy fast-paced reads, wild and witchy magic, swoon-worthy kisses, and small-town charm. The series is best read in order.

My Review

Paranormal fantasy is not a genre I have much dabbled in, and so I did not really know what to expect from this book. I’ll be the first to admit that I’m not much of a swoony romance type of girl, but the first thing about Tangled Roots that struck me was the quality of the writing. It has an intense, almost poetic style and an ethereal feel; the author is clearly competent in wordsmithery!

It’s brief but immersive, a passionate romance which thankfully didn’t get bogged down in erotica, which would have put me off!

I enjoyed the witchy aspect and the sensations relating to nature as the identity of each person’s magic, and how Nick and Cassie’s romance develops so quickly because of this. It is mysterious and although the brevity of the novella doesn’t allow us to get to know the intricate ins and outs of the characters, we know enough to feel their fears and desires and to wish for them to work out what is going on, even if it means they could be separated by time again.

Willow Creek became familiar very quickly, so the scene had been set well. Small town gossip is very accurately described and elicited a few wry smiles from me.

I enjoyed Tangled Roots, with its many goings on squeezed into a quick read, but it is a good story which is well-paced. Fans of adult paranormal/magical fantasy will no doubt enjoy it.

If you wish to buy Tangled Roots and set off on what promises to be a great series, please click here.

About the author

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Equal parts bookworm, flower child, and eclectic witch, Denise D. Young writes fantasy and paranormal romance featuring witches, magic, faeries, and the occasional shifter.

Whatever the flavor of the magic, it’s always served with a brisk cup of tea–and the promise of romance varying from sweet to sensual.

She lives with her husband and their animals in the mountains of Virginia, where small towns and tall trees inspire her stories. She reads tarot cards, collects crystals, gazes at stars, and believes magic is the answer (no matter what the question was).

If you’ve ever hoped to find a book of spells in a dusty attic, if you suspect every misty forest contains a hidden portal to another realm, or if you don’t mind a little darkness before your happily-ever-after, her books might be just the thing you’ve been waiting for.

To connect with the author:

Website

Facebook

Amazon Author Page

Goodreads

Pinterest

As always, this is a blog tour, and there are many other perspectives, extracts and guest posts to read. The other bloggers involved are shown here on the tour banner:

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Happy reading!

‘The Witches of New York’ by Ami McKay #TheWitchesofNewYork #bookbloggers #bookreviews

I’m a sucker for a cover and an interesting blurb, so I bought this book almost without thinking. Therefore, I haven’t read the prequel novels, however, this is fine as a standalone.

It’s set in 1880-81, and the historical backdrop of this story, which is for women, about women (although for men too, of course, if you enjoy an empowering read), is the transportation and erection (sorry) by men, of the mystical and undeniably phallic Cleopatra’s Needle in Manhattan.

Two hundred years after the witch trials in Salem, two witches, Adelaide Thom and Eleanor St. Clair open a tea shop in Manhattan, whose reputation builds a high society clientele, seeking cures, potions, and palmistry. Eleanor and Adelaide keep their secrets and are protected by these women in return. One of my favourite characters, Perdu, a raven, lives with Eleanor. He is not a bird.

Beatrice Dunn is a seventeen-year-old girl, with a dream of adventure and excitement. She makes a special wish, and soon afterwards, sees an advert for a job as an assistant in a Manhattan tea shop. The ad says that “those averse to magic need not apply.” It seems like just the opportunity she has been waiting for and, saying goodbye to her well-wishing aunt, she heads for Manhattan.

Beatrice becomes Eleanor’s apprentice, but her new life with the witches allows newly found powers to emerge. Adelaide, perhaps prematurely, introduces her to Dr. Quinn Brody who is a war veteran, newly arrived from Paris following the death of his father. He has become involved in the association in which his father was a member: The Fraternal Order of the Unknown Philosophers, which seeks to understand those phenomena which are inexplicable. Beatrice is introduced to a device of his, which she appears more than capable of producing results from, thereby drawing unwanted attention to the witches. Still at risk from dogmatic religion, these enlightened, self-assured, intelligent and independent women come under threat.

The differences between men who believe in the mystical, the unexplained and the spiritual, and women who do the same or less, is stark, disturbing and is explored at length. It is subtly done though and doesn’t seek to be divisive; simply to show.

During some musing, Dr. Brody, who is a thoroughly likeable character, wonders
“‘What is the weight of a soul? Where does it go when we die? Are there such things as ghosts? Can they speak to the living? What of spirits, demons, fairies and angels? Can dreams hold portents, visions, foretellings? Are witches real? Does magic exist?’

He thought if he could gain the answers he sought, he might publish them in a short book. It would be no doubt a risky endeavour, but wasn’t that the sort of risk that every scientist had to be willing to take? To profess truth despite the looming spectre of ridicule.”

Meanwhile, the highly esteemed Reverend Townsend has written a sermon, entitled ‘Against Intuition’ in which his train of thought is thus:

“Women often say they have a ‘knowing’, a ‘feeling’, that something is right or wrong. They’ll claim they’ve seen the answer to a great dilemma in a dream. Who are they to claim the gift of prophecy? What force compels them to speak such lies? More often than not their words are merely a ploy to get others to do their bidding. When caught, they say it was nothing but a silly, foolish game. They insist no one got hurt. But this sort of deceit is no laughing matter. It is a terribly crafty tool of women, especially when used upon trusting men – a tool of Satan himself. I say to all gentlemen, do not be fooled by women’s talk of intuition. I say to all women, do not be used by Devils as a mouthpiece for Satan’s foul words. The only special knowledge he’ll afford to you is misery.”

So, in 1880, the risks to a man of wondering and trying to prove such hypotheses included such horrors as ridicule. At the time, although the majority of witchcraft trials were over, the insane asylums were full. The book lists some of the reasons for women being committed and although I’ve seen these before, you’d need to read them to believe them.

This is a thought-provoking book, with an absorbing storyline, and appears well researched. I particularly liked the ‘witchy’ aspects; the family grimoire, the raven, the Dearlies, dreams, herbalism, tarot, palmistry, spirit mediumship etc. There are dark forces at work as well, but these are not related to the actions of the witches, rather those set against them who are willing to take matters into their own hands. There are some great female characters in the book; Beatrice and her Aunt Lydia, Eleanor, Adelaide, Mrs. Dashley and Mrs. Stevens. I liked the Bird Lady, and the ghosts are pretty fun too.

It is interesting to note the sources the author has used in the acknowledgements as well, particularly with regards to the Oz author L. Frank Baum.

All this having been said, I did make relatively slow progress. I did read a few chapters every day: I don’t know why, maybe life just got in the way this week, but it was certainly good enough to keep going back to, and a great read for this time of year.

The thinning of the veil…

wolf howling at moon

Well, here we are. It’s that time of year again. The nights are closing in; the veil between the worlds of the living and dead are thinning as I speak. Allegedly.

Without fail, I always try to scare myself witless for the next six weeks or so, year-in, year-out, therefore I have further burdened my already double stacked shelves in preparation.

I’m telling myself I’m mad, because first on the list this year is ‘The Woman in Black’ by Susan Hill. I have some experience of this story; twice I have seen it performed at The Theatre on the Lake in Keswick in the Northern Lake District, which is one of my favourite venues. The first time, I came out a bit shaken. The second time, a few years later once I’d had children, I exited the theatre a little bit psychologically damaged. To the point, that when the film with Daniel Radcliffe broke loose several years later, I couldn’t bring myself to watch it!

The books are never as bad though, right?

Also in the wings, I have MR James’ ‘Ghost Stories’, Daphne du Maurier’s ‘The Birds and other stories’, A Discovery of Witches’ by Deborah Harkness, ‘The Witches of New York’ by Ami McKay and I plan to revisit a story that I enjoyed at the time, but didn’t review and that is ‘The Loney’ by Andrew Michael Hurley. I have thought about it so often, and certain parts have really played on my mind in the period since, that I think I owe it a review.

Updates as I get through them. Think of me; I’m a wuss and I have no earthly idea why I do this to myself!